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Tips for Teaching the Common Core Narrative Writing Standards

Posted by Emily Guthrie on Sep 2, 2013 12:05:02 PM

I love teaching narrative writing to high school students!  I get so busy emphasizing effective argumentation and exposition, that narrative writing always seems like a breath of fresh air and a chance for students to get creative!  Here are my tips for teaching the common core narrative writing standards:

Tips for Teaching the Common Core Narrative Writing Standards

  • Know The Narrative Standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3a Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3c Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3d Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
    • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3e Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
  • Teach Writing with Literature:  Give students a concrete professional sample to study before they start writing to actively teach techniques like dialogue, sequencing, multiple plot lines, pacing, and the other standards.  Here are some examples:
    • Read excerpts from Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift and teach students to write narrative satires, which critique current society in a meaningful and allegorical way.  Teenagers are masters of satire if channeled properly.
    • Read "The  Street of the Cañon" by Josephina Niggli and inspire students to write imaginary narratives that celebrate their culture.
    • Read "Earth on Turtle's Back" or other origin myth and assign students to write their own narrative, explaining the origin of life, or natural phenomena.
    • Read "There Will Come Soft Rains" by Ray Bradbury and allow students to write narratives about what they think the future will look like.
    • Read excerpts from A Farewell to Manzanar Jean Wakatsuki Houston and James Houston. Have students write real narratives inspired by their own lives or family members' lives.

SmartFlip Common Core Reference Guides

  • Write Interdisciplinary Narratives:  Connect with other disciplines to create meaningful narrative assessments.  For example:
    • If your students are studying WWII in World History, have them write narratives from the trenches.  They can be love stories, battle stories, tales of camaraderie, or so many other options to include the interests of all students.  Be sure they include accurate historical information gleaned from their class.
    • If your students are studying the Gold Rush in US History, teach them to write imaginary narratives of failure or success in the Gold Rush.
    • If your students are studying about the laws of motion in physics, allow them to write elaborate narrative word problems in which the main character's real life problem is solved with he help of physics.
    • Have student write mystery narratives in which the detective uses math principals to find the culprit.
  • Emphasize pre-writing: Multiple points of view, interconnected plot lines, smooth transitions, and a coherent pieces are produced through thorough planning.  Don't rush the pre-writing stage.  Allow students to talk it out with a partner before writing so they can bounce new ideas off each other and take the story to the next level. You may even consider making this a partner effort.
  • Integrate Art: Whether it is drawn, painted, computer generated, or using any other medium, have students create art based on their narrative.  Here's the trick: Art must be based only on sensory details included in the text.  If students are unable to complete the art at first, they need to go back and add more detail.
  • Use Technology: Students can submit their narratives to a class blog for others to comment on.  Adding a peer audience almost always brings up the level of writing.
  • Help Students Reflect: After narratives have been crafted, it is not enough to grade it and give it back. Students need to reflect on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative and during the writing process.   This will help students have a greater appreciation for literature and their own skills.

What are your tips for teaching the narrative standard?  We'd love to hear your suggestions, questions, or comments!

Topics: Common Core, Writing, writing, writing prompts, writing tips

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