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Activism vs. Slacktivism: A Lesson in Research and Informational Texts

Posted by Emily Guthrie on May 13, 2015 12:48:30 AM

If you are like me, there are few things more exciting than introducing students to amazing novels and other works of fiction, but finding ways to engage students in informational texts can be a little trickier.  Today I want to share a lesson that I came upon recently that had students engaged in reading an informational text, researching credible sources, and discussing their findings.  I'll outline the lesson below.  Please comment with questions, comments, and other informational texts that your students love!

The Lesson: 

1. Start by reading Malcolm Gladwell's 2010 essay "Small Change: Why the Revolution Won't be Tweeted".  It is in my textbook and I've seen it popping up more and more in texts, but it is also widely available through an internet search.

2. Have students discuss the main assertion of the argument and the evidence Gladwell uses to support his thesis.  They should come to the conclusion that Gladwell's main argument is that social media movements do not constitute real activism. I think it is also helpful to have students do a collaborative list of evidence.

3. Then the fun starts!  Start with asking students to share their preliminary ideas about whether or not social media movements are real activism.  Here are some points for discussion:

  • How can we define activism?  What are necessary elements?
  • What social media movements have you seen or participated in?  Were they real activism?
  • How have social media movements changed since 2010?

4. Challenge students to do some research about the topic. This can be an in class search if students have access or it can be homework.  Remind them about using credible sources! Here are some topics to get them started on their research, but they should be used as a jumping off point for lots of avenues for discussion:

  • Slacktivism vs. Activism
  • Social Media in the Arab Spring
  • Kony 2012
  • The ALS ice bucket challenge
  • Social Media campaigns regarding: police, sexuality, race, gender, bullying, suicide, etc.

5. After students have completed some research, structure a discussion. You could use socratic seminar, debate, or other discussion technique depending on students and time constraints.

Extension idea: After the discussion, students could formulate arguments that defend, qualify, or refute Gladwell's assertion that social media movements are not real activism.

My students found this topic intriguing and easy to discuss in an academic setting.  I'd love to hear your questions, comments, and suggestions for other engaging informational texts in the comment section below!

SmartFlip Common Core Reference Guides

Topics: informational text, lesson, Lesson Planning, Literary Analysis/Reading Strategies, nonfiction, tips

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